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Tobacco


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Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, accounting for more than 480,000 deaths every year, or 1 of every 5 deaths.

Nearly 80 percent of all adult smokers begin smoking by age 18; and 90 percent do so before leaving their teens. With the rise of alternate forms of tobacco (e-cigarettes, hookah, etc.) tobacco continues to be a large public health concern. Compiled here are resources to address tobacco use among college students.

Scope


National Data

  1. Approximately  13%  of college aged students (ages 18-24) smoke cigarettes
  2. In 2015, nearly 7 in 10 adult cigarette smokers wanted to stop smoking
  3. ...and more than 5 in 10 adult cigarette smokers had made a quit attempt in the past year
  4. In high schools nationwide in the past 30 days,  20%  reported using a tobacco product in the past 30 days

Missouri Data

  1. 75% of Missouri college students have not used a tobacco product in the past year
  2. Missouri college students report rates of use of tobacco products in the past year as follows (check all that apply):

    Cigarettes

    13%

    E-Cigarettes

    13%

    Cigars

    8%

    Hookah

    7%
    Smokeless tobacco

    4%

    Tobacco pipes

    2%
  3. Of students who report using the above tobacco products in the past year, the following use that product every day:

    E-Cigarettes

    27%

    Cigarettes

    18%
    Smokeless tobacco

    21%

    Tobacco pipes

    2%

    Hookah

    1%

    Cigars

    1%
  4. Of students who use tobacco:
    1.  64%  have tried to quit since entering college
    2.  32%  are currently trying to quit or use less often
  5.  78%  of Missouri college students support having smoke-free outdoor university areas
  6.  82%  would prefer to go to a bar or restaurant that is smoke-free

Population Considerations

  1. Males are more likely to smoke than females (15% of U.S. adult males vs 13% of females)
  2. Cigarette smoking is highest among American Indians and Alaskan natives and people of multiple races, and lowest among Asian Americans
  3. Individuals living below the poverty line are nearly twice as likely to smoke as those living at or above poverty level (26% vs 14%)
  4. The Midwest has the highest rate of cigarette smoking (almost 19% of the U.S.)
  5. Individuals with disabilities smoke at higher rates than individuals with no disability (21% vs 14%)
  6. Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, and bisexual were more likely to be smokers than their heterosexual peers (20% vs 15%)

Best Practices


The CDC has a great guide on best practices for comprehensive tobacco control programs.

Tobacco Free College Campus Initiative has a wealth of resources for campuses to create policies, encourage compliance and enforcement, and more!

The Adolescent Smoking Cessation: Escaping Nicotine and Tobacco Program (ASCENT) program is listed in SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices as having effective outcomes for tobacco use.

Strategies to Reduce Tobacco Use

  1. Higher costs for tobacco products (for example, through increased taxes)
  2. Implement smoke free and tobacco free laws
  3. Raising the minimum age of sale for tobacco products to 21 years, which has recently emerged as a potential strategy for reducing youth tobacco use
  4. Community programs and school and college policies and interventions that encourage tobacco-free environments and lifestyles
  5. Community programs that reduce tobacco advertising, promotions, and availability of tobacco products
  6. Availability of cessation programs

PIP Resources